Which endangered animal calls your state home?

Find out what we’re doing to help. 

Today we’re excited to launch an interactive map where you can learn about efforts to protect your state’s wildlife in need. The Service developed the map to share stories of success and partnership built across America under the Endangered Species Act.

The new, web-based interactive map has information about endangered species success in every state. Find it at http://www.fws.gov/endangered.

The new, web-based interactive map has information about endangered species success in every state. Find it at http://www.fws.gov/endangered.

You’ll find stories of wildlife making strides towards recovery, audio interviews and podcasts with Service biologists about on-the-ground conservation, and videos that highlight our partners.

We’re proud to implement the federal Endangered Species Act. This landmark legislation has been very successful in stabilizing populations, preventing extinction, and conserving much-needed habitats.

But we haven’t done it alone, and we won’t be able to. Private landowners, students, developers, biologists, corporations, volunteers, businesses, artists and the military are among those whose help has already made a big difference. We’ll feature a state, partner and animal each day starting next Monday. Stay tuned!

Note: We’ve finished this cool series. Check it out! 

Here's the New York page, which features the sandplain gerardia plant, the bog turtle, and the Chittenango ovate amber snail, among others.

Here’s the New York page, which features the sandplain gerardia plant, the bog turtle, and the Chittenango ovate amber snail, among others.

14 Comments on “Which endangered animal calls your state home?

  1. Pingback: Partnering to save endangered animals: Virginia | U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Northeast Region

  2. Pingback: Partnering to save endangered animals: West Virginia | U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Northeast Region

  3. Pingback: Partnering to save endangered animals: Maryland | U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Northeast Region

  4. Pingback: Partnering to save endangered animals: Delaware | U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Northeast Region

  5. Pingback: Partnering to save endangered animals: New Jersey | U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Northeast Region

  6. Pingback: Partnering to save endangered animals: Pennsylvania | U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Northeast Region

  7. Pingback: Partnering to save endangered animals: Rhode Island | U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Northeast Region

  8. Pingback: Partnering to save endangered animals: Connecticut | U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Northeast Region

  9. Pingback: Partnering to save endangered animals: New York | U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Northeast Region

  10. Pingback: Partnering to save endangered animals: Massachusetts | U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Northeast Region

  11. Pingback: Partnering to save endangered animals: Vermont | U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Northeast Region

  12. Pingback: Partnering to save endangered animals: New Hampshire | U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Northeast Region

  13. Pingback: Partnering to save endangered animals: Maine | U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Northeast Region

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