Protecting endangered species on wildlife refuges

Two Canada lynx kittens
CT River, from Mt. Sugarloaf

A view of the Connecticut River from Mt. Sugarloaf. The Silvio O. Conte National Wildlife Refuge was established to conserve wildlife and their habitats in this 7.2 million acre watershed. A number of endangered animals call this area home.

National wildlife refuges protect important land for wildlife. They restore and enhance habitat, and they engage visitors in the Service’s conservation mission.

During National Wildlife Refuge Week in October, we focused a series on how national wildlife refuges help recover threatened and endangered species and how they help accomplish the mission.

Here’s what you should check out:

Now, get out to a wildlife refuge and experience it for yourself!

6 Comments on “Protecting endangered species on wildlife refuges

  1. Pingback: Bombay Hook Refuge celebrates 75 years of conservation | U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Northeast Region

  2. Pingback: Acting, naturally. | U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Northeast Region

  3. Pingback: Great Bay National Wildlife Refuge joins partners to help breed rabbits | U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Northeast Region

  4. Pingback: Linking red knots from Monomoy to Cuba and beyond | U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Northeast Region

  5. Pingback: Refuge tracking surveys show evidence of Canada lynx in Vermont | U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Northeast Region

  6. Pingback: Explore your national wildlife refuges! | U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Northeast Region

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