The war on white-nose syndrome: Refuge uses bunkers to fight bat disease

Bat Bunker #1 on a door surrounded by snow.
several people in different uniforms stand in front of a cave with snow around it

Biologists from federal and state agencies and universities work to find a cure for white-nose syndrome. Credit: Marvin Moriarty/USFWS

Biologists from across the Northeast are working tirelessly to find a way to keep white-nose syndrome from killing millions of bats.

A bat hangs upside down and has a white substance on its snout.

This little brown bat has white-nose syndrome. Credit: Marvin Moriarty/USFWS

The disease, caused by a fungus that appears on the face and other areas, affects hibernating bats.

Early detection methods using DNA analysis are some of the latest strides researchers have made to control the disease. Learn more from an article in the Philadelphia Inquirer.

Bat Bunker #1 on a door surrounded by snow.

Even when outside temperatures were 30 below, temperatures in the bunker were 37-39 F. Credit: Steve Agius/USFWS

Meanwhile, up in northern Maine, Aroostook National Wildlife Refuge experimented with using former cold war bunkers as safe artificial hibernacula. Read Assistant Refuge Manager Steve Agius’ blog about the project.

These structures provided surfaces for bats to cling to. Credit: Marvin Moriarty/USFWS

These structures provided surfaces for bats to cling to. Credit: Steve Agius/USFWS

A grassy field covers a bunker.

Cold war era bunkers at the former Loring Air Force Base were tested for their use as an artificial hibernacula. Credit: Steve Agius/USFWS

For more information about white-nose syndrome, visit http://whitenosesyndrome.org

One Comment on “The war on white-nose syndrome: Refuge uses bunkers to fight bat disease

  1. Pingback: NY, Vt. WNS Bats Winter in Maine | State Wildlife Research News

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