Star-spangled science

Meagan Racey and Tylar Greene from our agency. Credit: USFWS

We’re just as eager to get to those barbeques on Thursday, but first we want to share with you some of the red, white and blue that we’re celebrating this Independence Day!

Red knots flying over Mispillion Harbor, Delaware. Credit: Gregory Breese/USFWS

Red knots flying over Mispillion Harbor, Delaware. Credit: Gregory Breese/USFWS

Ever see a red knot? Our videographers Keith Shannon and Beth Decker took a road trip from our Hadley, Mass., office down to the Delaware Bay to catch these amazing shorebirds in action. Check out the video, and a great story about how our biologists band them to collect important information!

Atlantic white cedar is a rare, important, cone-bearing tree, valued for its rot-resistant wood, the habitat it provides for unique wildlife and its role in water quality. Photo from Flickr Creative Commons, user John B./Dendroica cerulea.

Atlantic white cedar is a rare, important, cone-bearing tree, valued for its rot-resistant wood, the habitat it provides for unique wildlife and its role in water quality. Photo from Flickr Creative Commons, user John B./Dendroica cerulea.

Thousands of acres of this Delaware swamp were once covered by the Atlantic white cedar. Settlers ditched and drained the wetlands, removing this light, rot-resistant and malleable wood. We’re out to bring this rare habitat back. (The link to this blog post will go live July 2).

Running from the Canadian border to Long Island Sound, the Connecticut River and its watershed include 2.4 million residents and 396 communities. The estimated 1.4 million people who enjoy the natural beauty and wildlife of the Connecticut River watershed every year contribute at least a billion dollars to local economies, according to the Trust for Public Land. Credit: USFWS

Running from the Canadian border to Long Island Sound, the Connecticut River and its watershed include 2.4 million residents and 396 communities. The estimated 1.4 million people who enjoy the natural beauty and wildlife of the Connecticut River watershed every year contribute at least a billion dollars to local economies, according to the Trust for Public Land. Credit: USFWS

What’s in a blueway? Secretary of the Interior Ken Salazar designated the region’s largest river system – the 410-mile-long Connecticut River – as the first National Blueway on May 24, 2012. The program emphasizes the unique value and significance of a headwaters-to-mouth approach and recognizes and supports existing local and regional conservation, recreation and restoration efforts, including those under the Service’s Silvio O. Conte National Wildlife Refuge. (The link to this blog post will go live July 3).

Happy Fourth of July! We’re over and out.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: