Young N’ Wild

Ever wonder what it’s like to work with us?

Well, we don’t have to tell you- hear directly from our young employees and interns about the amazing things they get to do while working with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service!

We are committed to conserving natural resources and one of the key components to conservation is working with the people that make it happen. Our interns and employees have the opportunity to explore a number of career choices, including biology, journalism, new media production, IT, education, accounting and more.

Want to get involved with the Fish and Wildlife Service? Find out how!

This summer, follow our future conservationists on their career journeys!

  • Audrey Bonk, a participant in the 2013 Career Discovery Internship Program (CDIP) which is a partnership between the Service and the Student Conservation Association, tells us what’s in a day of banding least terns in the Chesapeake Bay region!
  • Amara Huddleston, a CDIP intern, explains how she’s working to help control invasive species that threaten native plants and animals at Long Island refuges.
  • Meet the AmeriCorps crew at the Silvio O. Conte National Fish and Wildlife Refuge in Massachusetts, who are working on building a universally accessible trail at the refuge’s Fort River Division.
  • Brian Merewitz tells us about his small mammal research project in the Chesapeake Bay and what he learned by making it fool-proof.
  • Robert Haltner was studying business administration in college- until he met us! Find out what led him to pursue a career in conservation in the Lower Great Lakes region.
  • Stephanie Petrus is learning how to become a good scientist at Maine’s Rachel Carson National Wildlife Refuge. Find out what she loves just as much as clam chowder and lighthouses.
  • Jane Wong takes us into a day at Wertheim National WIldlife Refuge’s summer day camp program that provides a unique educational opportunity for youth in the Shirley, NY area.
  • Brittany Forslind is greening New Jersey and beyond as she tackles invasive species along the Appalachian Trail.
  • Camille Sims brings us to the Virginia coast at Back Bay National Wildlife Refuge. You don’t want to miss what she gets to do at work!
  • Crystal Ambrose is helping critters in the river and the sky at Ohio River Islands National Wildlife Refuge in West Virginia.
  • Beth Decker takes us on a journey through the camera lens. See how she’s capturing the mission.
  • Krystal Krejcik closes out our Young N’ Wild series by sharing her adventure leading the spirited Youth Conservation Corps crew at Back Bay National Wildlife Refuge this summer.

14 Comments on “Young N’ Wild

  1. Pingback: Checking on the terns at the Chesapeake Bay’s Poplar Island | U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Northeast Region

  2. Pingback: Mugwort, foxglove and barberry…oh my! | U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Northeast Region

  3. Pingback: Working to build an accessible trail at the Conte Refuge | U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Northeast Region

  4. Pingback: A fool-proof plan for rodents? | U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Northeast Region

  5. Pingback: Following my passion, helping the lower Great Lakes | U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Northeast Region

  6. Pingback: How to become a good scientist | U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Northeast Region

  7. Pingback: Connecting youth with nature on Long Island | U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Northeast Region

  8. Pingback: Working with a “Green Team” to restore habitat in New Jersey and beyond | U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Northeast Region

  9. Pingback: I found my niche! | U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Northeast Region

  10. Pingback: Helping critters in the river and the sky | U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Northeast Region

  11. Pingback: Capturing the mission | U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Northeast Region

  12. Pingback: Hammer and a nail: Building a team | U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Northeast Region

  13. I would like to share my story too! | U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service, Chincoteague National Wildlife Refuge

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