More than fish or energy

Joseph Dana of the Penobscot Indian Nation paddles a traditional birch-bark canoe past the breaching. Credit: Meagan Racey, USFWS

We’re sharing stories from our biologists and partners striving to restore the river for Atlantic salmon and other fish and ensuring it continues to provide benefits for the people of Maine. Today you’re hearing from John Banks, the director of the Department of Natural Resources for the Penobscot Indian Nation. The Penobscot River has sustained the tribe for more than 10,000 years.

Artwork on the Veazie Dam Breaching Poster from the Penobscot River Restoration Trust.

Artwork on the Veazie Dam Breaching Poster from the Penobscot River Restoration Trust.

This video is part of our ongoing celebration of the second dam removal in Maine’s Penobscot River restoration project! Last summer, Great Works Dam in Old Town and Bradley was taken down. On Monday, July 22, a community event kicked off the beginning of the removal of Veazie Dam, the closest dam blocking fish on the Penobscot from the ocean.

The lower river will flow freely from Milford to the sea, allowing endangered shortnose sturgeon, threatened Atlantic sturgeon, rainbow smelt, tomcod, and striped bass access to 100 percent of their historic habitat. Opening up the lower river will be a huge step forward in realizing the project’s goal to restore self-sustaining runs of all sea-run fisheries in the watershed. Learn more about the effort.

Wait – there’s more! See other videos and posts from work on Veazie and Great Works.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: