Meet #ScienceWoman Robyn Niver

Robyn Niver BrandedCelebrate Women’s History Month with us! This year, we’re looking forward by honoring women across the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and female conservationists who are making history in our agency and in conservation. With each #ScienceWoman, we’ll share a photo and a couple questions and answers about her work. Stay tuned for posts throughout the month!

Robyn wearing her awesome field hat. Credit: Meagan Racey/USFWS

Robyn wearing her awesome field hat. Credit: Meagan Racey/USFWS

Meet Robyn Niver, an endangered species biologist in our New York Field Office in Cortland. She studied wildlife ecology at the State University of New York College of Environmental Science and Forestry and at the University of Wisconsin-Madison.

Her female conservation heroes and mentors are Rachel Carson, Blanche Town with New York State Department of Environmental Conservation, and our very own Susi von Oettingen in our New England Field Office.

Robyn holding an endangered Karner blue butterfly at the Albany Pine Bush Preserve in New York. Credit: Meagan Racey/USFWS

Robyn holding an endangered Karner blue butterfly at the Albany Pine Bush Preserve in New York. Credit: Meagan Racey/USFWS

Q. What’s your favorite thing about working for the U.S. Field and Wildlife Service? A. My favorite thing about working for the Service is working with such amazing people (inside and outside of the agency) that really want to make a difference.

Q. If you could have one incredible animal adaptation, what would it be? A. Torpor, a strategy bats use to save energy. [This wouldn’t surprise you if you know Robyn, who is our region’s lead for conserving the endangered Indiana bat and the northern long-eared bat.] It’s a short term reduced body temperature, usually in response to cool temperatures or low food availability. Hibernation is more extended than torpor.

Robyn surveys for piping plovers along Lake Ontario. Photo courtesy of Robyn.

Biologist Scott Schlueter and Robyn survey for piping plovers along Lake Ontario. Photo courtesy of Robyn.

Don’t miss my podcast with Robyn about her work with the Chittenango ovate amber snail — which she affectionately calls the Chit.

See more #ScienceWoman profiles!

2 Comments on “Meet #ScienceWoman Robyn Niver

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