Meet #ScienceWoman Anne Secord

Anne Secord BrandedCelebrate Women’s History Month with us! This year, we’re looking forward by honoring women across the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and female conservationists who are making history in our agency and in conservation. With each #ScienceWoman, we’ll share a photo and a couple questions and answers about her work. Stay tuned for posts throughout the month!

Meet Anne Secord, the chief of the environmental quality branch in our New York Field Office in Cortland. Anne led a team that secured $19.4 million of restoration funds from parties responsible for releasing hazardous substances into the St. Lawrence River since at least the 1950s.

Anne and fellow New York Field Office biologist Sandie Doran getting ready to conduct winter census of bat hibernaculum in New York. Photo courtesy of Anne.

Anne and fellow New York Field Office biologist Sandie Doran getting ready to conduct winter census of bat hibernaculum in New York. Photo courtesy of Anne.

She studied wildlife biology at Cornell University and Virginia Tech. Her female conservation hero is Anne LaBastille, an ecologist who authored scientific papers, popular articles and books like the Woodswoman series and Women of the Wilderness.

Anne checking on the large number of bald eagles that winter at Onondaga Lake, the location of a Superfund site and cooperative case to assess and restore injured natural resources. Photo courtesy of Anne.

Anne checking on the large number of bald eagles that winter at Onondaga Lake, the location of a Superfund site and cooperative case to assess and restore injured natural resources. Photo courtesy of Anne.

Q. What’s your favorite thing about working for the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service? A. We work for the only federal agency that provides “in-the-dirt” protection for fish and wildlife resources. The agency is full of people who care deeply about our natural resources and take measurable steps to protect and improve them.

Anne investigating whether emerging contaminants like detergents or pharmaceuticals from sewage treatment plants are affecting fish health in the Raquette River, New York. Photo courtesy of Anne.

Anne investigating whether emerging contaminants like detergents or pharmaceuticals from sewage treatment plants are affecting fish health in the Raquette River, New York. Photo courtesy of Anne.

Q. If you could have one incredible animal adaptation, what would it be? A. I would love to be able to fly – to see the world from above it all – and it would shorten my commute.

See more #ScienceWoman profiles!

2 Comments on “Meet #ScienceWoman Anne Secord

  1. Pingback: Meet #ScienceWoman Amy Roe! | U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Northeast Region

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