Meet #ScienceWoman Amy Roe!

Amy Roe Branded

Celebrate Women’s History Month with us! This year, we’re looking forward by honoring women across the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and female conservationists who are making history in our agency and in conservation. With each #ScienceWoman, we’ll share a photo and a couple questions and answers about her work. Stay tuned for posts throughout the month!

Meet Amy Roe, a biologist in our New York Field Office in Cortland. She earned her masters and doctoral degrees in environmental toxicology at Clemson University.

Amy out collecting information as part of the Great Lakes Restoration Initiative study for the Niagara River Area of Concern. Photo courtesy of Amy.

Amy out collecting information as part of the Great Lakes Restoration Initiative study for the Niagara River Area of Concern. Photo courtesy of Amy.

Her heroes are all working women who have families that depend on them, and her mentors include environmental toxicology colleagues Diane Henshel, Cindy Lee, Anne Secord and Kathryn Jahn!

Amy and one of her mentors Anne Secord, another #ScienceWoman in the New York Field Office! Photo courtesy of Amy.

Amy and one of her mentors Anne Secord, another #ScienceWoman in the New York Field Office! Photo courtesy of Amy.

Q. How did you get interested in conservation? A. My concern for wildlife and the harm that contaminants can cause the environment guided me towards environmental conservation. I wanted to be a part of a team of scientists to make a positive difference for wildlife and their habitat.

Amy with fellow New York Field Office biologists dissecting fish as part of a study on contaminants of emerging concern. Photo courtesy of Amy.

Amy with fellow New York Field Office biologists dissecting fish as part of a study on contaminants of emerging concern. Photo courtesy of Amy.

Q. What’s your favorite thing about working for the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service? A. My top priority for wanting to work for the Service as a scientist is job stability. My favorite thing about actually working for the Service is knowing that I am contributing to habitat improvement, with on the ground habitat restoration projects, for fish and wildlife.  

Amy with biologist Scott Schlueter out collecting information for an eel study evaluating effects of contaminants on reproduction. Photo courtesy of Anne.

Amy with biologist Scott Schlueter out collecting information for an eel study evaluating effects of contaminants on reproduction. Photo courtesy of Anne.

Q. If you could have one incredible animal adaptation, what would it be? A. My physical adaptation would be flying.  I would love to be able to see the world as “habitat” just as our migratory trust resources view the world while in flight.

See more #ScienceWoman profiles!

One Comment on “Meet #ScienceWoman Amy Roe!

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: