Meet #ScienceWoman Anne Hecht

Anne Hecht, #ScienceWoman

In honor of International Migratory Bird Day May 9, we’re sharing #ScienceWoman profiles of biologists who are helping us save our feathered friends! Our #ScienceWoman campaign honors women across the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service who are making history in our agency and in conservation. With each #ScienceWoman, we share a photo and a couple questions and answers about her work. Stay tuned for more posts later this week.

Meet science woman Anne Hecht, an endangered species biologist at our Eastern Massachusetts National Wildlife Refuge

Anne earned a B.A. in philosophy and a Master’s degree in forestry. She finds the analytic thinking and writing skills from her philosophy courses extremely useful in her daily job. Anne coordinates our recovery efforts for the piping plover. Have a question about piping plovers? She’s your #ScienceWoman. She’s traveled as far south as the Bahamas, west into the Northern Great Plains and north into Canada to learn more about the shorebird and support conservation partnerships.

A piping plover and several chicks. Credit: Heidi Sanders, Friends of Ellisville Marsh in Plymouth, Mass.

A piping plover and several chicks. Photo credit: Heidi Sanders, Friends of Ellisville Marsh in Plymouth, Mass.

Q. How did you get interested in conservation? A. When I was 12 years old, I went to a YWCA summer camp in Maine that specialized in canoeing and hiking. At the end of the summer, I told my parents, “When I grow up, I’m going to marry a forest ranger.” Yikes!

Q. What’s your favorite species and why? Sandhill cranes. Piping plovers are cute, but cranes are magnificent.

Sandhill Cranes flying over Montezuma National Wildlife Refuge. Photo credit: Doug Racine, USFWS.

Sandhill Cranes flying over Montezuma National Wildlife Refuge. Photo credit: Doug Racine, USFWS.

See more #ScienceWoman profiles!

One Comment on “Meet #ScienceWoman Anne Hecht

  1. I think I’ve seen about a dozen piping plovers on the gulf shore of fort myers beach, florida. I am used to seeing them at CACO, FIIS, & on the outer banks at CAHA. is it possible? I’d like to talk with you more especially since great development is planned for where I observed these birds.

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