Meet #ScienceWoman Pam Loring

Pam Loring Branded

In honor of International Migratory Bird Day May 9, we’re sharing #ScienceWoman profiles of biologists who are helping us save our feathered friends! Our #ScienceWoman campaign honors women across the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service who are making history in our agency and in conservation. With each #ScienceWoman, we share a photo and a couple questions and answers about her work. Stay tuned for more posts later this week.

Meet #ScienceWoman Pam Loring, a Pathways Intern in our Division of Migratory Birds

Pam earned her BS in Wildlife and Fisheries Conservation at the University of Massachusetts-Amherst and her MS in Biological and Environmental Sciences at the University of Rhode Island. And she’s currently pursuing her PhD in Environmental Conservation at the University of Massachusetts.

“For my MS research at URI, I used satellite telemetry to study movement patterns and habitat use of sea ducks in southern New England. For my PhD research, I am using nanotags and automated radio telemetry stations to study the movements of terns and shorebirds in southern New England and New York,” says Pam. 

University of Massachusetts student Pam Loring is the principal investigator for the study (see a post written by her last year). Photo courtesy Pam Loring.

University of Massachusetts student Pam Loring. (see a post written by her in 2012). Photo courtesy Pam Loring.

Q. What’s your favorite thing about working for the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service? A. Having the opportunity to work with so many talented biologists and managers, on many different and important projects, including bird movement studies, AMAPPS surveys, waterfowl surveys, the shorebird plan, etc.

Q. What’s your favorite species and why? Common and roseate terns – they are just stunning to observe in the field and their various life history strategies never cease to amaze!

The northeastern population of the roseate tern is listed as endangered. Credit: Sarah Nystrom/USFWS

The northeastern population of the roseate tern is listed as endangered. Credit: Sarah Nystrom/USFWS

See more #ScienceWoman profiles!

One Comment on “Meet #ScienceWoman Pam Loring

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: