Experience coastal Maine, no lobster required

Benjamin Bristol speaks to the State Reps about the history of Timber Point. Photo by Ward Feurt.

Today’s blog post comes from Benjamin Bristol and Kim Snyder, interns at Rachel Carson National Wildlife Refuge

Ben Bristol is a summer intern at the Rachel Carson Wildlife Refuge. He studies political theory at Bowdoin College and spends his free time watching people watch birds.

Ben Bristol is a summer intern at the Rachel Carson Wildlife Refuge. He studies political theory at Bowdoin College and spends his free time watching people watch birds.

Kim Snyder is a writer by trade and a biologist at heart. She is currently working as an Outreach Intern at the Rachel Carson National Wildlife Refuge.

Kim Snyder is a writer by trade and a biologist at heart. She is currently working as an Outreach Intern at the Rachel Carson National Wildlife Refuge.

 

On June 8th, state representatives for Maine senators Alex Wajer (Representative of Senator Susan Collins) and Bonita Pothier (Representative of Senator Angus King) toured Timber Point with Rachel Carson National Wildlife Refuge Manager Ward Feurt and Outreach Intern, Benjamin Bristol. The representatives came out to get to know the new trail that the Refuge had opened the previous Friday, which includes a number of historic buildings. Timber Point stands gracefully apart on the developed coastline of southern Maine, capturing so much of what we love about the Maine landscape on a relatively small point of land. The rocky coast, marshes, woods, and extensive biodiversity together make the trail an excellent place for visitors to meet with Maine’s beautiful natural variety.

Timber Point trail at Rachel Carson National Wildlife Refuge

Timber Point trail at Rachel Carson National Wildlife Refuge

The representatives toured the Ewing cottage on their walk, observing first-hand how the simple architecture of the estate is made beautiful by its surroundings: thick woods on one side and open water on the other. Whether blue and crisp or grey and stormy, the coastal horizon looks pristine from the southern point of the peninsula, where the old cottage has stood for more than 85 years. The Ewings were not politicians or public servants, but they understood their place in the ecosystem, loving and respecting the power of their environment.

The historic Ewing house on Timber Point as seen from Timber Island. Photo by Kim Snyder.

The historic Ewing house on Timber Point as seen from Timber Island. Photo by Kim Snyder.

Timber Point is a space where people can come into contact with nature and see what is means to live harmoniously with it, something that might be more important now than ever. It’s an honor and a pleasure to get the chance to share this message with all visitors, something we welcome every chance we get.

Benjamin Bristol speaks to the State Reps about the history of Timber Point. Photo by Ward Feurt.

Benjamin Bristol speaks to the State Reps about the history of Timber Point. Photo by Ward Feurt.

 

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