Tag Archives: indiana bat

Habitat partnership bats a thousand in Pennsylvania

Today we’re sharing the hard work of Tom and Wendy Belinda, who have dedicated themselves to conserving habitat for endangered Indiana Bats on their land in Blair County, Pennsylvania. White-nose syndrome, human disturbance, and habitat loss have caused our nation’s bat populations to plummet. Close proximity to places where bats roost and hibernate makes the Belindas’ property prime real estate for bat conservation in Pennsylvania.

Indiana Bats

Credit: Ann Froscheaur/USFWS

Working with federal agencies like the USDA’s Natural Resource Conservation Service and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, along with the Pennsylvania Game Commission and local partners, has allowed the Belindas to manage their property for the benefit of Indiana Bats and other vulnerable species. However, enhancing the health of their forests not only improves wildlife habitat, it also boosts the value and productivity of their land. A true win-win.

Check out our bat story map to learn more about the nationwide effort to conserve bats.

For more information about white-nose syndrome, visit www.whitenosesyndrome.org.

Baby, It’s Cold Outside

Winter has arrived in the Northeast and snow is in the forecast. While we are piling on the cozy layers and feasting on soup and hot chocolate, outside temperatures are dropping and food for wildlife is getting scarce. Animals across the region are tackling the season head-on and have some impressive strategies to cope with winter conditions.

In the winter, snowshoe hares completely transform, their fur changing from brown to white for better camouflage in the snow. They spend their time eating and hiding which helps to conserve energy for their encounters with predators, such as the lynx. Further south, the New England cottontail uses its brown coat to blend into thick underbrush, and uses snow as a ladder to reach higher shoots, seedlings and twigs.

Have you ever wondered where amphibians and reptiles go in the winter? Most frogs, turtles, and snakes dramatically decrease their activity and enter a state of brumation, or dormancy, where their temperature drops and the heart rate slows down dramatically. Many turtles will bury themselves in mud at the bottom of a pond and absorb oxygen through their skin from the surrounding water. Wood frogs are even capable of freezing solid under leaves in forested areas. They are able to do this by filling their cells with a sugary substance that acts like antifreeze. The frog’s heartbeat stops and stays dormant all winter until they thaw again in spring!

A piping plover and chick by Kaiti Titherington/USFWS

For many birds, the cold is just too much to bear. Like many of us in the winter, migrating birds including the piping plover, leave their homes on the chilly northern coast and take a vacation down south to the warmer shorelines and sandy beaches. Most piping plover are already in their vacation nests by mid-September and come back to work (and mate) by mid-April. Bird migrations vary in length, but some range from hundreds to thousands of miles each year.

An American black bear in a tree. Photo by Courtney Celley/USFWS

If long distance migration isn’t your thing, why not just sleep through winter like the American black bear? Bears aren’t true hibernators, but they can doze for up to 100 days at a time by slowing their metabolism and dropping their core temperature. Bears usually put on fifteen pounds a week during the fall to prepare for their long nap and stretch without food.

As Andrew King took this shot, an Indiana bat flew beneath a large hibernating cluster of Indiana bats on the ceiling of Ray’s Cave, IN (taken pre-white nose syndrome.)

The Indiana bat, a true hibernator, accumulates layers of fat and spends months tucked away in its hibernaculum, like a cave or mine. Throughout winter, bats periodically rouse to move between hibernacula, before their heart rate and body temperature is dramatically lowered to conserve energy. Sadly, white-nose syndrome is plaguing bat hibernacula and causing populations of bats to plummet. Learn more about white-nose syndrome here.

A ruffed grouse in the snow by Head Harbor Lightstation/ Creative Commons

Ruffed grouse are non-migratory birds. They stick out the winters in their usual homes in a protected thicket or burrowed in the snow.  In the late fall, feathers begin to grow on their legs to protect from the cold and help conserve body heat. Pectinations (fleshy comb-like projections along their toes) help them walk on soft snow, roost and burrow. Down feathers allow birds to trap air against their body to stay warm, and many birds will even cuddle together to keep warm.

Swallows cuddle up to keep warm. Photo by Keith Williams/ Creative Commons

We can learn a thing or two from wildlife this winter. Cuddling, sleeping, or vacationing through winter doesn’t sound half bad, especially if you’re not a fan of winter weather!

Cheat River gorge. Credit: Craig Stihler, West Virginia Division of Natural Resources

The future is bright for WV’s Cheat Canyon

Hooray! 3,800 acres along seven miles of West Virginia’s Cheat River will be protected for future generations and wildlife to enjoy.

Pretty amazing right? A shot of the recently protected portion of Cheat Canyon. Photo courtesy of Craig Stihler, West Virginia Division of Natural Resources

Pretty amazing right? A shot of the recently protected portion of Cheat Canyon. Photo courtesy of Craig Stihler, West Virginia Division of Natural Resources

Cheat Canyon is home to the threatened flat-spired three-toothed snail (also known as the Cheat threetooth) and the endangered Indiana bat. Our staff has worked for many years with the West Virginia Division of Natural Resources, The Nature Conservancy, The Conservation Fund, and a number of other non-profit groups and private citizens to protect the species in this awe-inspiring gorge. We provided the initial funding for the approximately $7 million project with a $1.5 million grant through our Cooperative Endangered Species Conservation Fund, and we’re working with others to secure additional funds for the effort. The grant, with matching funds from The Nature Conservancy, secured 2,000 acres of the project.

We’re proud to be a part of this incredible effort to protect the iconic Cheat Canyon and the rare and endangered species that call it home,” said our regional director, Wendi Weber. “A project of such scale relies on the collaboration and creativity of many organizations, and the range of Cheat Canyon partners reflects the significance of this spectacular landscape for both people and wildlife.”

Cheat River Gorge from overlook - Coopers Rock State Forest, West Virginia. Photo from Flickr Creative Commons user Jon Dawson.

Cheat River Gorge from overlook – Coopers Rock State Forest, West Virginia. Photo from Flickr Creative Commons user Jon Dawson.

Here’s the press release from our partner, The Nature Conservancy.

Cheat Canyon, one of West Virginia’s most iconic landscapes and a magnet for outdoor recreation, will be protected for future generations by a conservation partnership that includes The Nature Conservancy, The Conservation Fund, and the West Virginia Division of Natural Resources, the groups announced today.

The Conservation Fund, in partnership with The Nature Conservancy, has acquired 3,800 acres along a seven mile stretch of the Cheat River. The Nature Conservancy will retain 1,300 acres of the property as a new nature preserve, with funding from a bequest from the estate of Charlotte Ryde. Over the coming two years, the remaining land will be transferred to the West Virginia Division of Natural Resources, which will manage it as a complement to the complex of public recreation lands on the lower Cheat River.

When completed, the $7 million project will conserve most of the Canyon not already included in Cooper’s Rock State Forest and Snake Hill Wildlife Management Area, conserving the spectacular scenic and natural values of the canyon and improving future public access for fishing, hunting, hiking, and whitewater rafting.

Cheat Canyon is a deep gorge through which the Cheat River flows between Rowlesburg in Preston County to Cheat Lake in Monongalia County, and is best known as the view from Cooper’s Rock and as a popular whitewater rafting destination. The property being acquired includes the entire section of the canyon used for commercial rafting.

“This is exciting news for the Mountain State,” West Virginia Gov. Earl Ray Tomblin said. “Through this partnership, thousands of acres along Cheat River will be opened for public recreation—providing new opportunities for outdoor enthusiasts, right here at home.”

The canyon is home to a diversity of wildlife from the endangered Indiana bat to more common species like black bears, otters, and bald eagles, and is the only place on Earth where the federally listed as threatened Cheat threetooth snail occurs.

The flat-spired three-toothed snail is found only in West Virginia, in a restricted area of the Cheat River Gorge with sandstone cliffs, outcroppings and large boulders. The snail lives in cracks and crevices in the rocks and surrounding leaf litter. Photo courtesy of Craig Stihler, West Virginia Division of Natural Resources

The flat-spired three-toothed snail is found only in West Virginia, in a restricted area of
the Cheat River Gorge with sandstone cliffs, outcroppings and large boulders. The snail lives in cracks and crevices in the rocks and surrounding leaf litter. Photo courtesy of Craig Stihler, West Virginia Division of Natural Resources

The Conservation Fund negotiated the purchase from its current owner, The Forestland Group, a timber investment firm. The Nature Conservancy is providing $3 million in private funding and is acquiring 2300 acres of the property, and will retain 1300 acres as the new Charlotte Ryde Nature Preserve. The remaining acreage is to be subsequently acquired by the West Virginia Division of Natural Resources. Additional funding is coming from moneys dedicated for land conservation from the West Virginia Outdoor Heritage Conservation Fund, a $1.5 million grant from the Land and Water Conservation Fund (LWCF) through the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service’s Cooperative Endangered Species Conservation Fund, and $400,000 from the West Virginia Department of Environmental Protection In Lieu Fee Program.

cheat-canyon-map

“This is one of the most beloved landscapes in West Virginia. It is, in many ways, the New River Gorge of northern West Virginia,” said Rodney Bartgis, state director of The Nature Conservancy in West Virginia. “We’re looking forward to this project fulfilling the hopes of so many outdoor enthusiasts and nature lovers. The substantial investment the Conservancy is making in this project reflects our commitment to this landscape.”

Both The Conservation Fund and The Nature Conservancy expressed appreciation to the West Virginia congressional delegation, especially Senators Jay Rockefeller and Joe Manchin and Rep. Nick Rahall and Rep. Shelley Moore Capito, for their support of the federal Land and Water Conservation Fund that helps to make efforts like these possible.

“We’re particularly grateful to Governor Tomblin for recognizing the value of this landscape to West Virginians,” said Reggie Hall, West Virginia state director for The Conservation Fund. “The conservation of the property’s distinctive ecosystems, including the scenic viewshed along a premier springtime rafting route, will be a victory shared by wildlife and recreational enthusiasts alike.”

Hibernating Indiana bats (Myotis sodalis). Credit: USFWS/Ann Froschauer

Hibernating Indiana bats (Myotis sodalis). Credit: USFWS/Ann Froschauer

Once acquired, the Division of Natural Resources will manage the property as a component of its Wildlife Management Area system. The project also provides the opportunity to reopen a section of the 330-mile Allegheny Trail that had to be re-routed after it was closed off by a previous owner. Although the river has suffered some pollution from past mining activities, water quality is steadily recovering, thanks to decades of work and millions of dollars in investments by local people, state agencies, and groups like Friends of Cheat. As a result, the river boasts a growing number of smallmouth bass.

Check out a news story about the project.