Tag Archives: National Aquarium

Engaging Baltimore Students in Urban Habitat and Water Quality Enhancement

Leah Davis, Chesapeake Bay Conservation Corps Member, sets the stage today with her project to connect Baltimore students with wildlife and their watershed.

For students in Baltimore City, and across the nation, environmental stewardship often takes a back seat to math and reading goals. Contrary to this, the students at Benjamin Franklin High School are engaged in science and service learning from the time they enroll as ninth graders. This year students have been participating in a Meaningful Watershed Education Experience (MWEE) with the Baltimore Rivers to Harbor Urban Wildlife Refuge Partnership (formally named Masonville Cove Urban Wildlife Refuge Partnership) and several other Baltimore area environmental organizations.

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Students, their teacher, and staff from USFWS and the National Aquarium pose with the planted rain garden. The environmental science and biology teachers at Benjamin Franklin High School will incorporate the garden into future lessons about habitat, water quality, and pollution. Credit: Chris Guy, USFWS

This year, students took part in a series of field experiences where they conducted research, made detailed observations, and discovered actions they can take to minimize the adverse effects they may have been having on the watershed. During a fieldtrip to Masonville Cove Environmental Education Center, students collected and analyzed water quality data with guidance from the Living Classrooms Foundation naturalists. Staff from the Chesapeake Bay Field Office and the National Aquarium assisted students in conducting a mini-bioblitz on the Masonville Cove campus, discovering the various pollinator species and other wildlife living in the urban habitat.

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Gaby Roffe of the National Aquarium holds a monarch butterfly students captured at Masonville Cove Environmental Education Center. Credit: Leah Davis, USFWS

In an additional field experience exercise, students investigated water flow on their campus noting features such as topography and impermeable surfaces. Once students further understood the environmental and ecological implications of urban water movement in their watershed, they discussed possible “student action projects” to improve the water and habitat quality in the community. In addition to common ideas such as picking up litter, washing cars in designated areas, and avoiding pesticide use, students agreed that installing a rain garden on campus would be a great way to improve both water and habitat quality in the community.

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Environmental science students plant native fall nectar sources that will provide urban habitat for monarch butterflies and other pollinator species. Credit: Leah Davis, USFWS

A 450 square foot rain garden was installed on Benjamin Franklin High School’s campus with funding provided by the Chesapeake Bay Trust and CSX CorporationThe garden, constructed by Blue Water Baltimore, filters runoff and provides pollinator habitat in the urban watershed. While the technical design of the garden was completed by Chesapeake Bay Field Office biologists and partners, students assisted with designing the plant layout in the garden and planted native milkweeds and fall nectar sources. Students summarized their experiences throughout the entire MWEE in group presentations to their peers.

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The newly constructed rain garden filters up to 350 cubic feet of water during rain events. Credit: Leah Davis

The enthusiasm and commitment of these high school students and members of the Masonville Cove Urban Partnership clearly show that residents of urban areas have a big role to play in the future of America’s cities and conservation of wildlife.

Baby black rat snake found while removing fallen tree limbs (Taken by Sarah Carpe)

Conservation from an (unlikely?) source

From left to right we have Logan Kline, Sarah Carpe, Sheldon Mason and Adler (AJ) Pruitt

From left to right we have Logan Kline, Sarah Carpe, Sheldon Mason and Adler (AJ) Pruitt

Today’s post comes from Sarah Carpe, one of our Masonville Cove Baltimore Urban Conservation & Education Interns, in conjunction with the National Aquarium in Baltimore, MD.

My name is Sarah, and I’m an Urban Conservation and Education Intern at Masonville Cove. From June 13th – 24th, I spent time at Patuxent Research Refuge with three other interns and my field supervisor, Molly Finch. In our time on the refuge we shadowed several positions within the conservation field.

The preservation of earth’s natural state includes a few positions that naturally come to mind. Wildlife biologist, conservationist, and environmental scientist are some common careers in conservation.

While these positions are essential, and we observed many of them at the refuge, there are some less well known jobs that are of equal importance to restoring our environment.

For a majority of our time at Patuxent Research Refuge, we worked with the facilities department. I learned that the work they do has a direct impact on the refuge. Our firsthand experience showed us the direct benefits of this job and its importance to conservation.

Facilities staff do a variety of jobs, many of which require physical labor. In the short time we spent working with them, we removed illegally dumped tires, fallen tree limbs, and massive piles of scrap aluminum, wood, and fiberglass roofing.

Interns working (Taken by Molly Finch)

Interns working (Taken by Molly Finch)

I feel as though shining a light on what the Patuxent facilities staff do is of massive importance because it had the most immediate impact of any position that I observed at Patuxent. If you didn’t know what was there a week before we cleaned the dump sites, you never had any clue.

Working for facilities isn’t entirely physical either; we viewed tons of organisms in our time outside. A short list includes foxes, wild turkeys, turtles (both box turtles and red eared sliders), frogs, toads, mice, groundhogs, dragonflies, fish, and several others.

Baby black rat snake found while removing fallen tree limbs (Taken by Sarah Carpe)

Baby black rat snake found while removing fallen tree limbs (Taken by Sarah Carpe)

The wildlife we saw while spending time with this department was so amazing because none of it was planned. Unlike a wildlife biologist where you have a predetermined animal that is is the focus of your survey (perhaps a box turtle), we saw the habitat as a whole, with all of its organisms in our focus. Facilities work gave me an eye for what Patuxent really looks like in terms of wildlife as well as its mission as part of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.

Being in the presence of so much wildlife really connected me to the surrounding habitat as well as the other conservation positions that aren’t the typical careers. While every environmental career has an influence, facilities staff play an invaluable role in conservation that has an impact you can see instantaneously.

Logan helps gather the plants the high schoolers have maintained throughout their school year. (Photo by Molly Finch)

Learning By Doing: The Value of Environmental Education

From left to right we have Logan Kline, Sarah Carpe, Sheldon Mason and Adler (AJ) Pruitt

From left to right we have Logan Kline, Sarah Carpe, Sheldon Mason and Adler (AJ) Pruitt

Today’s post comes from Logan Kline, one of our Masonville Cove Baltimore Urban Conservation & Education Interns, in conjunction with the National Aquarium in Baltimore, MD.

With dibble bars in hand, waders on, and plants at the ready, students from New York’s Chenango Forks High School charge into their native wetland with brave intentions to restore the plant life of their unique ecosystem.

Wood ducks, red-winged blackbirds, and copious bullfrogs rest in the murky waters of the school’s marshland and depend on native vegetation for food, shelter, and protection.  Without the pickerelweed, arrow arum, and wetland grass the students were attempting to restore, the rich wildlife of the school’s wetland would taper away until nothing remained but algae, mosquitoes, and moss.

As they absorbed information and tactics for restoring wetland vegetation, the students became aware of an overarching theme that I have come to be cognizant of throughout this internship program and my college experience: the importance of hands-on environmental stewardship coupled with education.

Thrown headfirst into wetland restoration, our high school and elementary school students asked thought-provoking questions that wouldn’t have struck them so significantly had they been answered in the dry safety of their classroom. When one of the older kids wanted to know something about the snails, there was no picture to bring up on a screen or diagram to pick apart; we reached into the water, grabbed a snail, and let them have an up-close encounter with the subject of their interrogation. Lessons and memories associated with hard work and indulging experiences have the potential to stick with our students and make a lasting impression on our youth.

For me, environmental education was the last thing I thought of when looking into careers that would put me in a position to change the world. College and its heavy emphasis on research immediately offered the prospects of becoming a lab worker, while the more liberal half of the college promoted policy work but I kept searching for a career choice that would take me out into the field while simultaneously giving me the opportunity to watch others absorb the beauty and importance of our environment.  I found what I wanted in environmental education.

Logan helps gather the plants the high schoolers have maintained throughout their school year. (Photo by Molly Finch)

Logan helps gather the plants the high schoolers have maintained throughout their school year. (Photo by Molly Finch)

Delving into hands-on experience working outside is an imperative step towards involving our modern generation in environmental stewardship and education. It’s been wonderful partaking in activities throughout this internship that that allow us to serve as ambassadors, spreading an important environmental message to students. As I form my own experiences and develop my unique passion within the environmental field, I’m realizing just how influential outdoor experiences are for our youth.

I can’t begin to explain how much I value the opportunities, specifically to witness environmental education that this internship has given me. We aren’t always wallowing around in wetlands or supervising students, but the moments we interact with the youth are my favorite by far. It is in these moments that I see the fruits of our labor and the blooming potential for a better, more environmentally friendly world.