Tag Archives: STEM

Meet #ScienceWoman Georgia Basso

Celebrate Women’s History Month with us! This year, we’re looking forward by honoring women across the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and female conservationists who are making history in our agency and in conservation. With each #ScienceWoman, we’ll share a photo and a couple questions and answers about her work. Stay tuned for posts throughout the month!

Georgia Basso Branded

Meet Georgia Basso, a Wildlife Biologist at the USFWS Coastal Program in Charleston, Rhode Island. She studied Entomology and Applied Ecology at the University of Delaware for her undergrad, and landscale scale conservation at the Yale School of Forestry and Environmental Studies for her graduate work.

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Q. What’s your favorite thing about working for FWS? A. My colleagues in Region 5. I feel lucky to work with so many smart, dedicated, passionate people. They are an inspiration.

Q. If you could have one incredible animal adaptation, what would it be? A. The speed and maneuverability of a Northern goshawk. I worked with goshawks in Nevada early in my career and was so impressed by their aerial skills. Being able to weave through a dense forest with the speed, skill and grace of a goshawk would bring a new dimension to trail running, mountain biking and skiing!

See more #ScienceWomen profiles here.

Meet #ScienceWoman Molly Sperduto!

Molly SperdutoBranded Our #ScienceWoman campaign kicked off during Women’s History Month, and we’re going to keep on rolling! We’re looking forward by honoring women across the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and female conservationists who are making history in our agency and in conservation. With each #ScienceWoman, we’ll share a photo and a couple questions and answers about her work. Stay tuned for more posts!

Meet #ScienceWoman Molly Sperduto, biologist in our New England Field Office in Concord, New Hampshire.

Molly and her son Nick monitor nest boxes made and installed by the Canterbury Elementary School. Photo courtesy of Molly.

Molly and her son Nick monitor nest boxes made and installed by the Canterbury Elementary School. Photo courtesy of Molly.

Molly studied biology and natural resource conservation at Duke University (I — Meagan — went to Duke’s rival, University of North Carolina. We’ve worked out our differences. 😉 ) and University of New Hampshire. Her conservation mentor is Lisa Williams from our East Lansing Field Office in Michigan.

Molly has been recognized for her pivotal role in planning and implementing restoration for more than 15 individual settlements in four New England states—resulting in many miles of restored streams and thousands of acres of habitat restored, enhanced or protected.

A birding field trip with the Belmont Middle School in Canterbury, New Hampshire. Photo courtesy of Molly.

A birding field trip with the Belmont Middle School in Canterbury, New Hampshire. Photo courtesy of Molly.

Q. How did you get interested in conservation? A. My mom got me interested in conservation. When I was very young, we used to spend hours looking for spring wildflowers together. And as I grew older, she encouraged me to spend time backcountry canoeing in an incredible wilderness area in northern Ontario. Since then, protecting natural landscapes is something that I’ve always wanted to do!

Feeding Baird's tapir at the Belize Zoo. Photo courtesy of Molly.

Feeding Baird’s tapir at the Belize Zoo. Photo courtesy of Molly.

Q. What’s your favorite species and why? A. This is so difficult, but one of my current favorites is the Baird’s tapir – their closest relatives are horses and rhinos and they are kind of funky looking, with a long nose. I’d like to see one in the wild someday!

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Meet #ScienceWoman Amber Rhodes!

Amber Rhodes Branded

Celebrate Women’s History Month with us! This year, we’re looking forward by honoring women across the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and female conservationists who are making history in our agency and in conservation. With each #ScienceWoman, we’ll share a photo and a couple questions and answers about her work. Stay tuned for posts throughout the month!

Amber measures a leatherback sea turtle hatchling in Costa Rica in 2014. Photo courtesy of Amber.

Amber measures a leatherback sea turtle hatchling in Costa Rica in 2014. Photo courtesy of Amber.

Meet Amber Rhodes, a biological science technician in our New Jersey Field Office in Pleasantville. She studied at Old Dominion University in Virginia and Indiana University-Purdue University Fort Wayne, and she is an engineer for the Army National Guard.

Amber operating a MarshMaster to restore habitat on private lands as part of our Partners for Fish and Wildlife Program. Photo courtesy of Amber.

Amber operating a MarshMaster to restore habitat on private lands as part of our Partners for Fish and Wildlife Program. Photo courtesy of Amber.

Amber conducted her thesis on sea turtles in Costa Rica, assessing how beach dynamics affect nest site selection and hatching success of green sea turtles.

Q. What’s your favorite thing about working for the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service? A. I love the fact that I get to work with landowners to restore fish and wildlife habitat, through the Service’s Partners for Fish and Wildlife Program. Most wildlife is found on private lands and by engaging private landowners we can work together to protect fish and wildlife and restore native habitat.

Amber collecting data on a female black sea turtle nesting for her thesis. Photo courtesy of Amber.

Amber collecting data on a female black sea turtle nesting for her thesis. Photo courtesy of Amber.

Q. What’s your favorite species and why? A. Sea turtles! They’re amazing, females will travel thousands of miles just to return to the beach where they were born. It is an incredible experience to watch them come up on the beach, meticulously creating a nest in which to place her eggs. Once they hatch about 6-8 weeks later, only 1 in a 1000 will reach adulthood.

Q. If you could have one incredible animal adaptation, what would it be? A. To breathe under water.

Amber while she was working with the National Park Service at Assateague. Photo courtesy of Amber.

Amber while she was working with the National Park Service at Assateague. Photo courtesy of Amber.

See more #ScienceWoman profiles!