U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Northeast Region

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Salt marshes provide habitat for fish, birds, and invertebrates and purify water by taking up nutrients that can be harmful in excess. They help protect neighboring coastal communities by buffering against wind and waves and absorbing, then slowly releasing, floodwaters. Salt marshes are threatened by sea-level rise and their tendency to gradually sink. The Fish and Wildlife Service is using a process called thin-layer deposition to restore these valuable habitats.

A new video from the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service offers an overview of the coastline and salt marsh restoration at a refuge on Delaware Bay. “Building a Stronger Coast: Prime Hook National Wildlife Refuge” is a behind-the-scenes look at how engaged partners and solid science came together to improve conditions for wildlife and the local community.

These machines could move mountains. It’s hard to imagine that big, powerful machines like the Komatsu Excavator and Pisten Bully are used to preserve a delicate marsh ecosystem.  But elevation loss from rising seas and sinking land is a challenge facing many coastal marshes. During large storms, marshes act like buffers, absorbing major surges of floodwater. Over time, sand and sediment can get washed away from these areas. A lack of sediment… Read More