Tag Archives: women in conservation

Meet #ScienceWoman Anne Hecht

Anne Hecht, #ScienceWoman

In honor of International Migratory Bird Day May 9, we’re sharing #ScienceWoman profiles of biologists who are helping us save our feathered friends! Our #ScienceWoman campaign honors women across the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service who are making history in our agency and in conservation. With each #ScienceWoman, we share a photo and a couple questions and answers about her work. Stay tuned for more posts later this week.

Meet science woman Anne Hecht, an endangered species biologist at our Eastern Massachusetts National Wildlife Refuge

Anne earned a B.A. in philosophy and a Master’s degree in forestry. She finds the analytic thinking and writing skills from her philosophy courses extremely useful in her daily job. Anne coordinates our recovery efforts for the piping plover. Have a question about piping plovers? She’s your #ScienceWoman. She’s traveled as far south as the Bahamas, west into the Northern Great Plains and north into Canada to learn more about the shorebird and support conservation partnerships.

A piping plover and several chicks. Credit: Heidi Sanders, Friends of Ellisville Marsh in Plymouth, Mass.

A piping plover and several chicks. Photo credit: Heidi Sanders, Friends of Ellisville Marsh in Plymouth, Mass.

Q. How did you get interested in conservation? A. When I was 12 years old, I went to a YWCA summer camp in Maine that specialized in canoeing and hiking. At the end of the summer, I told my parents, “When I grow up, I’m going to marry a forest ranger.” Yikes!

Q. What’s your favorite species and why? Sandhill cranes. Piping plovers are cute, but cranes are magnificent.

Sandhill Cranes flying over Montezuma National Wildlife Refuge. Photo credit: Doug Racine, USFWS.

Sandhill Cranes flying over Montezuma National Wildlife Refuge. Photo credit: Doug Racine, USFWS.

See more #ScienceWoman profiles!

Piping plover. Credit: William Majoros.

International Migratory Bird Day is Almost Here!

Ruby-throated Hummingbird. (Photo credit: Bill Thompson, USFWS)

Ruby-throated Hummingbird. (Photo credit: Bill Thompson, USFWS)

Birds of a feather flock together, and we’re celebrating all of them!

International Migratory Bird Day (IMBD) is just around the corner! This year’s IMBD will focus on the importance of habitat to birds. By protecting birds and their habitat we’re benefiting all other species, including humans! Did you know that birds act as pollinators? Without them would have fewer flowering plants and foods that depend on pollinators.

One habitat that is critical for birds in the Northeast region is the Atlantic shorelines. The American oystercatcher is one such bird that depends on the shore for survival. Their diet consists of mussels, clams, and as their name would suggest–oysters–as well as other small sea creatures.

American oystercatcher at Back Bay National Wildlife Refuge in Virginia. (Photo credit: USFWS)

American oystercatcher at Back Bay National Wildlife Refuge in Virginia. (Photo credit: USFWS)

We’ll be celebrating migratory birds all week! Each day we’ll highlight a #ScienceWoman working to protect our feathered friends. Stay tuned!

Meet #ScienceWoman Susan Adamowicz

Our #ScienceWoman campaign kicked off during Women’s History Month, and we’re going to keep on rolling! We’re looking forward by honoring women across the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and female conservationists who are making history in our agency and in conservation. With each #ScienceWoman, we’ll share a photo and a couple questions and answers about her work. Stay tuned for more posts later this week honoring Hurricane Sandy Women in Science.

Susan A Branded

Meet science woman Susan Adamowicz, Ph. D. She’s our Land Management Research and Demonstration Biologist at Rachel Carson National Wildlife Refuge. In her words: “I develop and execute innovative ways to restore salt marsh ecosystems, I also help coordinate the Salt Marsh Integrity assessment project.”

She’s studied at numerous prestigious schools, including BU, UVM, IU, SDSU and URI/GSO and lists her conservation heroes as Rachel Carson and Joy Adamson.

Q. How did you get interested in conservation? A. I grew up in the 1960s and 1970s and saw what people were doing to the planet – mostly in terms of pollution and animal extinction.  I had thought about being a wildlife veterinarian for a while but then decided there were enough of those.  But there were hardly any planet doctors.

Q. If you could have one animal adaptation, what would it be and why? A. I love salt marshes because I grew up alongside of them, and coastal systems are where things are happening on the natural and human scales.  We joke about having “salt marsh super power,” and my favorite would be to walk on mud like a Great Blue Heron.

See more #ScienceWoman profiles.