Tag Archives: women in STEM

Meet #ScienceWoman Georgia Basso

Celebrate Women’s History Month with us! This year, we’re looking forward by honoring women across the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and female conservationists who are making history in our agency and in conservation. With each #ScienceWoman, we’ll share a photo and a couple questions and answers about her work. Stay tuned for posts throughout the month!

Georgia Basso Branded

Meet Georgia Basso, a Wildlife Biologist at the USFWS Coastal Program in Charleston, Rhode Island. She studied Entomology and Applied Ecology at the University of Delaware for her undergrad, and landscale scale conservation at the Yale School of Forestry and Environmental Studies for her graduate work.

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Q. What’s your favorite thing about working for FWS? A. My colleagues in Region 5. I feel lucky to work with so many smart, dedicated, passionate people. They are an inspiration.

Q. If you could have one incredible animal adaptation, what would it be? A. The speed and maneuverability of a Northern goshawk. I worked with goshawks in Nevada early in my career and was so impressed by their aerial skills. Being able to weave through a dense forest with the speed, skill and grace of a goshawk would bring a new dimension to trail running, mountain biking and skiing!

See more #ScienceWomen profiles here.

Meet #ScienceWoman Mariana Bergerson!

Mariana Branded

Our #ScienceWoman campaign kicked off during Women’s History Month, and we’re going to keep on rolling! We’re looking forward by honoring women across the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and female conservationists who are making history in our agency and in conservation. With each #ScienceWoman, we’ll share a photo and a couple questions and answers about her work. Stay tuned for more posts!

Meet #ScienceWoman Mariana Bergerson, deputy refuge manager of John Heinz National Wildlife Refuge at Tinicum.

Mariana studied biology and environmental studies at Ursinus College and Saint Joseph’s University. Her female conservation hero is renowned primatologist and conservationist Jane Goodall.

Tree swallow at Missisquoi National Wildlife Refuge. Credit: Ken Sturm/USFWS

Tree swallow at Missisquoi National Wildlife Refuge.
Credit: Ken Sturm/USFWS

Q. How did you get interested in conservation? A. Growing up in the city of Philadelphia, I always loved the times when I was able to explore the nature in my neighborhood. Through classes and experiences in college, I discovered that conservation work was for me! Now I enjoy working at an urban refuge not only protecting important open space for wildlife but connecting youth to nature in a way that I wish I had growing up!

Q. What’s your favorite species and why? A. The tree swallow is my favorite species. Their deep-blue iridescent color is beautiful in the sunlight and their acrobatic flight is really entertaining, which helps kids get excited about birds. It also helps that they eat pesky mosquitoes too!

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Meet #ScienceWoman Deb Rocque!

Deb Rocque BrandedOur #ScienceWoman campaign kicked off during Women’s History Month, and we’re going to keep on rolling! We’re looking forward by honoring women across the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and female conservationists who are making history in our agency and in conservation. With each #ScienceWoman, we’ll share a photo and a couple questions and answers about her work. Stay tuned for more posts!

Meet #ScienceWoman Deb Rocque, our deputy regional director for the Northeast Region.

Deb studied ornithology at the University of Connecticut and the University of Alaska Fairbanks. Her female conservation hero is Brina Kessel, the first female professor at the University of Alaska Fairbanks.

Deb working with eiders at Walrus Island. Photo courtesy of Deb.

Deb in Walrus Islands (Alaska) for a project on eiders. Photo courtesy of Deb.

Q. How did you get interested in conservation?  A. I spent summers with my great-grandmother. We were always outside and she was always teaching me about critters and encouraging me to muck around in tidal pools.

Bill Archambault,  Deputy Assistant  Regional Director for Fisheries (left), North Attleboro National Fish Hatchery Larry Lofton, and  Deputy  Regional Director Deborah Rocque peer into a viewing pool with Atlantic salmon at North Attleboro National Fish Hatchery. Credit: Catherine J. Hibbard/USFWS

Bill Archambault, Deputy Assistant Regional Director for Fisheries (left), North Attleboro National Fish Hatchery Larry Lofton, and Deputy Regional Director Deborah Rocque peer into a viewing pool with Atlantic salmon at North Attleboro National Fish Hatchery. Credit: Catherine J. Hibbard/USFWS

Q. If you could have one incredible animal adaptation, what would it be? A. Flight! How cool would it be to never be stuck and traffic again?

See more #ScienceWoman profiles!