• Driven by instincts and a pickup truck: An Atlantic salmon’s journey towards recovery

    That’s how many Atlantic salmon make their way to spawning habitat in Lake Champlain’s tributaries nowadays. Learn why this species disappeared from the lake in the 19th century, and how it is making a comeback today thanks to collaboration by partners in the basin.

  • Welcome to our blog!

    We’re dedicated to conserving the nature of the Northeast. Our mission is to work with others to protect fish, wildlife and plants and their habitats from Virginia north to Maine.

  • My life after the internship

    We’re checking in with our past interns to find out what they’ve been up to since their last internship with us. Find out where they are now since they fled the nest!

Salt marshes provide habitat for fish, birds, and invertebrates and purify water by taking up nutrients that can be harmful in excess. They help protect neighboring coastal communities by buffering against wind and waves and absorbing, then slowly releasing, floodwaters. Salt marshes are threatened by sea-level rise and their tendency to gradually sink. The Fish and Wildlife Service is using a process called thin-layer deposition to restore these valuable habitats.

Starting a new position can be challenging, but Hispanic Access Foundation intern, Crystal Leckie, fit right in with the Service’s goal to conserve wildlife and their habitats for all to enjoy.

Maribel Juarez, Hispanic Access Foundation Intern, works to preserve the natural world while exploring her career in conservation.